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What is the best Sleeping Position ?

Posted by Bed Universe on

What’s the Best Sleep Position?

Do you sleep on your back, side, or belly? You may have a favorite sleeping position, or you may change it up now and then. And if you become pregnant, or have certain health problems, the way you sleep can sometimes change. In those cases, getting your sleeping posture right can make a big difference in the way you feel when you wake up. Are you choosing the best sleeping position for your situation?

Sleeping in the wrong way can cause or aggravate neck or back pain. It may also obstruct the airways to your lungs, leading to problems like obstructive sleep apnea. Some research even suggests that the wrong sleeping position may cause toxins to filter out of your brain more slowly. Keep reading to learn how the way you sleep could be impacting your health in several ways.

This is sometimes called the prone position.

Do You Sleep on Your Stomach?

Approximately 7% of people sleep on their stomach. This is sometimes called the prone position. It may help ease snoring by shifting fleshy obstructions from your airway. But sleeping in this position may aggravate other medical conditions.

Your neck and spine are not in a neutral position when you sleep on your stomach. This may cause neck and back pain. Stomach sleeping can put pressure on nerves and cause numbness, tingling, and nerve pain.

It's best to choose another sleep position if you are a stomach sleeper. If you can't break the habit, prop your forehead up on a pillow so your head and spine remain in a neutral position and you have room to breathe.

People who sleep this way have their arms wrapped around a pillow.

The Freefall Position

About 7% of people sleep on their stomachs with their heads turned to the side. People who sleep this way have their arms wrapped around a pillow or tucked under a pillow.

Sleep experts refer to this as the supine position.

Do You Sleep on Your Back?

Back-sleeping has its advantages and disadvantages, too. Sleep experts refer to this as the supine position.

Let's start with the bad news. Some people who sleep on their backs may experience low back pain. It can also make existing back pain worse, so this is not the best sleep position for lower back pain. If you suffer from snoring or sleep apnea, sleeping on your back may aggravate these conditions as well. Women should avoid this position during late pregnancy.

There are health benefits to sleeping on your back, too. Your head, neck, and spine are in a neutral position so you're less likely to experience neck pain. Sleeping on your back with your head slightly elevated with a small pillow is considered the best sleeping position for heartburn.

This is a poor choice for snoring.

The Soldier Position

In this position, the sleepers lie on their backs and their arms are down and close to the body. Approximately 8% of people sleep like this.

This one is a poor choice for snoring and may prevent you from getting a restful night's sleep. Talk to your doctor if snoring keeps you from getting enough rest.

People who sleep in a starfish position sleep on their backs with their arms up over their heads.

The Starfish Position

People who sleep in a starfish position sleep on their backs with their arms up over their heads. Approximately 5% of people sleep this way.

As all those who sleep on their backs, people who sleep in the starfish position may be prone to snoring and sleep problems.

The side sleeping position is the most popular by far.

Do you sleep on your side?

The side sleeping position is the most popular by far. It's also known as lateral sleeping position by sleep scientists.

This position may be good for those who snore. If you have some forms of arthritis, sleeping in the side position may make you sore, though. Curling up may also prevent you from breathing deeply because doing so may restrict your diaphragm.

Side-Sleeping and Brain Waste

It's possible that sleeping on your side could be good for your brain. Scientists recently learned that our brains clear out waste more quickly while we sleep.

Whether or not the position you sleep in influences this waste removal is unclear. But one study performed on rats suggests side-sleeping might clear brain waste more efficiently than other postures.

Wrinkle Worries

Although side-sleepers enjoy many advantages, one disadvantage may appear as you age. Because you press down on your face in the lateral position, this posture may both cause facial wrinkles and cause the skin on your face to expand over time.

Sagging Breasts

Side-sleeping women may find that their breast ligament (the Coopers Ligament) slowly stretches over time, causing breast sag. This hasn't been proven scientifically, yet continues to be a concern for many. If this concerns you, a simple solution is to support your breasts with a pillow. Women with larger breasts may find it more comfortable to sleep with a bra for additional support.

Some studies suggest that more women than men sleep in this position.

The Fetal Position

Approximately 41% of people sleep using a specific side position by curling up on their sides with their knees bent. Side sleepers who sleep with their legs bent and curled toward their torsos are sleeping in the fetal position.

Some studies suggest that more women than men sleep in this position, although other research disputes this. It may be a good choice for pregnant women because this posture improves circulation for both the mother and fetus.

If sleeping this way hurts your hips, placing a pillow between your knees may help relieve pressure.

People who sleep in the log position sleep on their sides with their arms down next to their bodies.

The Log Position

People who sleep in the log position sleep on their sides with their arms down next to their bodies. Approximately 15% of people sleep like a log. This sleep position may be good for you if you snore, but if you have arthritis, you may wake up in pain.

People who sleep in the yearner position sleep on their sides with their arms outstretched in front of the body.

The Yearner Position

People who sleep in the yearner position sleep on their sides with their arms outstretched in front of the body. The position may be good if you have breathing problems when you snooze, but bad if you suffer from arthritis. Approximately 13% of people sleep in this position.

Spooning is a side sleeping position for couples. The person in the back holds the one in the front close to their body.

The Spooning Position

Spooning is a side sleeping position for couples; the person in the back holds the one in the front close to their body. As with other postures, this one comes with its own advantages and disadvantages. As for disadvantages, couples may wake up more frequently sleeping this way, as you are more likely to be jostled by your partner.

But spooning allows for cuddling, too, which stimulates the release of oxytocin. This is a hormone that promotes bonding, decreases stress, and may help you get to sleep more quickly. Cuddling for as little as 10 minutes is enough to trigger the release of oxytocin.

Sleeping on the right side can cause more acid to leak through your esophagus.

What Side is Best for GERD?

Believe it or not, knowing the best side to sleep on may reduce your acid reflux symptoms. Sleeping on your right side can cause more acid to leak through your esophagus. Sleeping on your stomach or back makes GERD symptoms worse, too. To lower the risk of GERD problems, patients usually sleep best on their left sides.

People with congestive heart failure avoid sleeping on their backs and their left sides.

Side-Sleeping and Heart Failure

People with congestive heart failure avoid sleeping on their backs and their left sides. Their heartbeats may disturb their sleep in these postures. These patients tend to prefer sleeping on their right side. In fact, sleeping on the right side may protect people with heart failure from further health damage.

If you sleep on your stomach or side, your face is smooshed into the pillow all night.

What’s the Best Position for Preventing Wrinkles?

If you sleep on your stomach or side, your face is smooshed into the pillow all night. That stretches your skin over time, leading to wrinkles. If you want to prevent this, back sleeping works best.

If you snore, but still want to sleep on your back, try stacking a few pillows underneath your head.

Best Sleeping Position for Snoring and Sleep Apnea

To minimize the risk of snoring, it's usually best to sleep on your side. Sleeping on your back may aggravate snoring, but for a smaller number of snorers, back sleeping helps them feel more restful the next day.

Tips to Stop Snoring

If you snore, but still want to sleep on your back, try stacking a few pillows underneath your head to reduce the risk of snoring. If snoring wakes you up or if you wake up gasping or feel tired during the day, it's time to see your doctor.

Sleep Apnea

Severe or loud snoring may be a sign of sleep apnea, a condition that causes you to stop and start breathing while you sleep due to airway obstructions. Sleep apnea is associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

If you have sleep apnea, the way you sleep is well-known to influence how sleepy you feel throughout the next day.

One large study found that most patients with obstructive sleep apnea slept better on their sides, experienced less interrupted sleep, and were more wakeful the next day. However, this same study found that people with severe OSA actually felt sleepier the next day if they slept on their sides, as compared to their backs. Ask your doctor for sleep recommendations if you think you might have OSA.

If you have back pain, sleeping on your stomach or back may aggravate your pain.

Best Sleeping Positions for Back, Shoulder, and Neck Pain

If you have back pain, sleeping on your stomach or back may aggravate your pain. Switch to side sleeping to minimize your risk of back pain.

For further relief, put a pillow between your knees to keep your hips in alignment. If you must sleep on your back, placing a pillow under your knees will take some strain off of your back.

Shoulder, Neck, and Upper Back Pain

Arthritis and other painful conditions along your upper spine can worsen or improve while you sleep. Studies seem to disagree, though, on what positions are ideal.

One large study found that people had less shoulder pain who slept in the starfish position—on their backs, with hands up near their chest or head. But it couldn't explain if those people had less shoulder pain because of the way they slept, or if they slept that way because they had less pain.

A later study found that people who slept on their backs with their arms at their sides—the soldier position—activated their shoulder muscles less, and thus may experience less shoulder pain.

If you are pregnant, sleeping on your stomach or back will be uncomfortable or impossible.

Best Sleeping Positions During Pregnancy

If you are pregnant, sleeping on your stomach or back will be uncomfortable or impossible. You will be most comfortable sleeping on your side. Favor your left side to maximize circulation for both you and your baby. Placing a body pillow or pillow under your belly can help relieve back pain. Place another pillow between your legs and bend your knees to be even more comfortable.

Avoid This Position During Pregnancy

You've probably already heard this from your doctor, but just in case—pregnant women should not sleep on their backs during the third trimester of pregnancy. For more than half a century, we've known that pregnant back sleepers are reducing blood flow to their fetus.

But only recently researchers discovered that this sleep style also raises the risk of a stillbirth, even in otherwise healthy pregnancies. You should also avoid lying on your back during the day—just 30 minutes of this posture has been shown to force your fetus to shift to a state that requires less oxygen to survive. These results suggest that lying on your back—even for a short rest—reduces the oxygen available to your fetus.

Mattresses are made of a variety of materials. Some are softer or firmer.

Is Your Mattress Comfortable?

Mattresses are made of a variety of materials. Some are softer or firmer. The type of material that a mattress is made out of affect your body temperature.

When it comes to the firmness of a mattress, you want one that is firm enough to support your spine, but also soft enough to conform to the shape of your body. People who suffer from back pain may be most comfortable on a mattress that is softer and more cushioning.

You can't know for sure how your mattress will work out until you've been resting on it for a while. When shopping for a mattress, buy one from a store that will let you test it for several weeks and exchange it if it doesn't work for you.

More recent studies have cast doubt on these theories.

Can Sleeping Posture Predict Your Personality?

That depends on what you consider "personality." In the 70s and 80s, some researchers claimed they could use sleeping postures to predict if someone were impulsive, feminine, anxious, self-confident--even whether they could be hypnotized.

More recent studies have cast doubt on these theories. The research has been criticized for using "woefully small" numbers of sleepers. Many contradictions have been found between these studies as well.

A more recent attempt to associate personality traits to body positions during sleep came up empty-handed. It showed only a "very weak relationship between sleep positions and personality," and, using predictions from earlier models, failed to reliably predict the participants' personality traits.

But on the Other Hand...

Even if earlier studies are unreliable, there may be another way that our sleep postures say something about our personalities. Some sleeping positions are associated with well-rested sleepers. Maybe people who prefer them wake up less crabby and irritable, and are more alert during the day.

Here are some examples, using the Big Five personality traits. A group of 22,000 American and Japanese adults were measured over 10 years. The ones who slept poorly tended to become less conscientious over time. The ones who slept best were the most extroverted and the least neurotic.

So, at the end of the day, the best sleeping position for you may simply be the one that leaves you feeling your best the next day.

Read more

What is the best Sleeping Position ?

Posted by Bed Universe on

What’s the Best Sleep Position?

Do you sleep on your back, side, or belly? You may have a favorite sleeping position, or you may change it up now and then. And if you become pregnant, or have certain health problems, the way you sleep can sometimes change. In those cases, getting your sleeping posture right can make a big difference in the way you feel when you wake up. Are you choosing the best sleeping position for your situation?

Sleeping in the wrong way can cause or aggravate neck or back pain. It may also obstruct the airways to your lungs, leading to problems like obstructive sleep apnea. Some research even suggests that the wrong sleeping position may cause toxins to filter out of your brain more slowly. Keep reading to learn how the way you sleep could be impacting your health in several ways.

This is sometimes called the prone position.

Do You Sleep on Your Stomach?

Approximately 7% of people sleep on their stomach. This is sometimes called the prone position. It may help ease snoring by shifting fleshy obstructions from your airway. But sleeping in this position may aggravate other medical conditions.

Your neck and spine are not in a neutral position when you sleep on your stomach. This may cause neck and back pain. Stomach sleeping can put pressure on nerves and cause numbness, tingling, and nerve pain.

It's best to choose another sleep position if you are a stomach sleeper. If you can't break the habit, prop your forehead up on a pillow so your head and spine remain in a neutral position and you have room to breathe.

People who sleep this way have their arms wrapped around a pillow.

The Freefall Position

About 7% of people sleep on their stomachs with their heads turned to the side. People who sleep this way have their arms wrapped around a pillow or tucked under a pillow.

Sleep experts refer to this as the supine position.

Do You Sleep on Your Back?

Back-sleeping has its advantages and disadvantages, too. Sleep experts refer to this as the supine position.

Let's start with the bad news. Some people who sleep on their backs may experience low back pain. It can also make existing back pain worse, so this is not the best sleep position for lower back pain. If you suffer from snoring or sleep apnea, sleeping on your back may aggravate these conditions as well. Women should avoid this position during late pregnancy.

There are health benefits to sleeping on your back, too. Your head, neck, and spine are in a neutral position so you're less likely to experience neck pain. Sleeping on your back with your head slightly elevated with a small pillow is considered the best sleeping position for heartburn.

This is a poor choice for snoring.

The Soldier Position

In this position, the sleepers lie on their backs and their arms are down and close to the body. Approximately 8% of people sleep like this.

This one is a poor choice for snoring and may prevent you from getting a restful night's sleep. Talk to your doctor if snoring keeps you from getting enough rest.

People who sleep in a starfish position sleep on their backs with their arms up over their heads.

The Starfish Position

People who sleep in a starfish position sleep on their backs with their arms up over their heads. Approximately 5% of people sleep this way.

As all those who sleep on their backs, people who sleep in the starfish position may be prone to snoring and sleep problems.

The side sleeping position is the most popular by far.

Do you sleep on your side?

The side sleeping position is the most popular by far. It's also known as lateral sleeping position by sleep scientists.

This position may be good for those who snore. If you have some forms of arthritis, sleeping in the side position may make you sore, though. Curling up may also prevent you from breathing deeply because doing so may restrict your diaphragm.

Side-Sleeping and Brain Waste

It's possible that sleeping on your side could be good for your brain. Scientists recently learned that our brains clear out waste more quickly while we sleep.

Whether or not the position you sleep in influences this waste removal is unclear. But one study performed on rats suggests side-sleeping might clear brain waste more efficiently than other postures.

Wrinkle Worries

Although side-sleepers enjoy many advantages, one disadvantage may appear as you age. Because you press down on your face in the lateral position, this posture may both cause facial wrinkles and cause the skin on your face to expand over time.

Sagging Breasts

Side-sleeping women may find that their breast ligament (the Coopers Ligament) slowly stretches over time, causing breast sag. This hasn't been proven scientifically, yet continues to be a concern for many. If this concerns you, a simple solution is to support your breasts with a pillow. Women with larger breasts may find it more comfortable to sleep with a bra for additional support.

Some studies suggest that more women than men sleep in this position.

The Fetal Position

Approximately 41% of people sleep using a specific side position by curling up on their sides with their knees bent. Side sleepers who sleep with their legs bent and curled toward their torsos are sleeping in the fetal position.

Some studies suggest that more women than men sleep in this position, although other research disputes this. It may be a good choice for pregnant women because this posture improves circulation for both the mother and fetus.

If sleeping this way hurts your hips, placing a pillow between your knees may help relieve pressure.

People who sleep in the log position sleep on their sides with their arms down next to their bodies.

The Log Position

People who sleep in the log position sleep on their sides with their arms down next to their bodies. Approximately 15% of people sleep like a log. This sleep position may be good for you if you snore, but if you have arthritis, you may wake up in pain.

People who sleep in the yearner position sleep on their sides with their arms outstretched in front of the body.

The Yearner Position

People who sleep in the yearner position sleep on their sides with their arms outstretched in front of the body. The position may be good if you have breathing problems when you snooze, but bad if you suffer from arthritis. Approximately 13% of people sleep in this position.

Spooning is a side sleeping position for couples. The person in the back holds the one in the front close to their body.

The Spooning Position

Spooning is a side sleeping position for couples; the person in the back holds the one in the front close to their body. As with other postures, this one comes with its own advantages and disadvantages. As for disadvantages, couples may wake up more frequently sleeping this way, as you are more likely to be jostled by your partner.

But spooning allows for cuddling, too, which stimulates the release of oxytocin. This is a hormone that promotes bonding, decreases stress, and may help you get to sleep more quickly. Cuddling for as little as 10 minutes is enough to trigger the release of oxytocin.

Sleeping on the right side can cause more acid to leak through your esophagus.

What Side is Best for GERD?

Believe it or not, knowing the best side to sleep on may reduce your acid reflux symptoms. Sleeping on your right side can cause more acid to leak through your esophagus. Sleeping on your stomach or back makes GERD symptoms worse, too. To lower the risk of GERD problems, patients usually sleep best on their left sides.

People with congestive heart failure avoid sleeping on their backs and their left sides.

Side-Sleeping and Heart Failure

People with congestive heart failure avoid sleeping on their backs and their left sides. Their heartbeats may disturb their sleep in these postures. These patients tend to prefer sleeping on their right side. In fact, sleeping on the right side may protect people with heart failure from further health damage.

If you sleep on your stomach or side, your face is smooshed into the pillow all night.

What’s the Best Position for Preventing Wrinkles?

If you sleep on your stomach or side, your face is smooshed into the pillow all night. That stretches your skin over time, leading to wrinkles. If you want to prevent this, back sleeping works best.

If you snore, but still want to sleep on your back, try stacking a few pillows underneath your head.

Best Sleeping Position for Snoring and Sleep Apnea

To minimize the risk of snoring, it's usually best to sleep on your side. Sleeping on your back may aggravate snoring, but for a smaller number of snorers, back sleeping helps them feel more restful the next day.

Tips to Stop Snoring

If you snore, but still want to sleep on your back, try stacking a few pillows underneath your head to reduce the risk of snoring. If snoring wakes you up or if you wake up gasping or feel tired during the day, it's time to see your doctor.

Sleep Apnea

Severe or loud snoring may be a sign of sleep apnea, a condition that causes you to stop and start breathing while you sleep due to airway obstructions. Sleep apnea is associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

If you have sleep apnea, the way you sleep is well-known to influence how sleepy you feel throughout the next day.

One large study found that most patients with obstructive sleep apnea slept better on their sides, experienced less interrupted sleep, and were more wakeful the next day. However, this same study found that people with severe OSA actually felt sleepier the next day if they slept on their sides, as compared to their backs. Ask your doctor for sleep recommendations if you think you might have OSA.

If you have back pain, sleeping on your stomach or back may aggravate your pain.

Best Sleeping Positions for Back, Shoulder, and Neck Pain

If you have back pain, sleeping on your stomach or back may aggravate your pain. Switch to side sleeping to minimize your risk of back pain.

For further relief, put a pillow between your knees to keep your hips in alignment. If you must sleep on your back, placing a pillow under your knees will take some strain off of your back.

Shoulder, Neck, and Upper Back Pain

Arthritis and other painful conditions along your upper spine can worsen or improve while you sleep. Studies seem to disagree, though, on what positions are ideal.

One large study found that people had less shoulder pain who slept in the starfish position—on their backs, with hands up near their chest or head. But it couldn't explain if those people had less shoulder pain because of the way they slept, or if they slept that way because they had less pain.

A later study found that people who slept on their backs with their arms at their sides—the soldier position—activated their shoulder muscles less, and thus may experience less shoulder pain.

If you are pregnant, sleeping on your stomach or back will be uncomfortable or impossible.

Best Sleeping Positions During Pregnancy

If you are pregnant, sleeping on your stomach or back will be uncomfortable or impossible. You will be most comfortable sleeping on your side. Favor your left side to maximize circulation for both you and your baby. Placing a body pillow or pillow under your belly can help relieve back pain. Place another pillow between your legs and bend your knees to be even more comfortable.

Avoid This Position During Pregnancy

You've probably already heard this from your doctor, but just in case—pregnant women should not sleep on their backs during the third trimester of pregnancy. For more than half a century, we've known that pregnant back sleepers are reducing blood flow to their fetus.

But only recently researchers discovered that this sleep style also raises the risk of a stillbirth, even in otherwise healthy pregnancies. You should also avoid lying on your back during the day—just 30 minutes of this posture has been shown to force your fetus to shift to a state that requires less oxygen to survive. These results suggest that lying on your back—even for a short rest—reduces the oxygen available to your fetus.

Mattresses are made of a variety of materials. Some are softer or firmer.

Is Your Mattress Comfortable?

Mattresses are made of a variety of materials. Some are softer or firmer. The type of material that a mattress is made out of affect your body temperature.

When it comes to the firmness of a mattress, you want one that is firm enough to support your spine, but also soft enough to conform to the shape of your body. People who suffer from back pain may be most comfortable on a mattress that is softer and more cushioning.

You can't know for sure how your mattress will work out until you've been resting on it for a while. When shopping for a mattress, buy one from a store that will let you test it for several weeks and exchange it if it doesn't work for you.

More recent studies have cast doubt on these theories.

Can Sleeping Posture Predict Your Personality?

That depends on what you consider "personality." In the 70s and 80s, some researchers claimed they could use sleeping postures to predict if someone were impulsive, feminine, anxious, self-confident--even whether they could be hypnotized.

More recent studies have cast doubt on these theories. The research has been criticized for using "woefully small" numbers of sleepers. Many contradictions have been found between these studies as well.

A more recent attempt to associate personality traits to body positions during sleep came up empty-handed. It showed only a "very weak relationship between sleep positions and personality," and, using predictions from earlier models, failed to reliably predict the participants' personality traits.

But on the Other Hand...

Even if earlier studies are unreliable, there may be another way that our sleep postures say something about our personalities. Some sleeping positions are associated with well-rested sleepers. Maybe people who prefer them wake up less crabby and irritable, and are more alert during the day.

Here are some examples, using the Big Five personality traits. A group of 22,000 American and Japanese adults were measured over 10 years. The ones who slept poorly tended to become less conscientious over time. The ones who slept best were the most extroverted and the least neurotic.

So, at the end of the day, the best sleeping position for you may simply be the one that leaves you feeling your best the next day.

Read more


10 Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas

Posted by Bed Universe on

There are no rules to how you should decorate your home, except to go with styles and designs that you love. You’re the one who needs to live in it, of course, and that’s definitely the case for rooms such as your bedroom. It’s the room you often take solace in, sleeping, hiding, and generally chilling out in there. You spend more time in your bedroom than you’d think, so it makes sense to make it a place that you love the look of. If grey and silver bedroom ideas are right up your street, you’re going to love the 21 bedroom designs we’re about to show you.

We can’t wait to hear which ones are your favourite, so make sure you let us know in the comments at the bottom. If you’ve got a grey and silver bedroom to die for, send in your pictures! We’d love to feature you.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas

1 – Grey + Silver Theme

Don’t necessarily follow a “theme” when looking at your grey and silver bedroom ideas, instead choose to go with the flow. You might find that pieces that don’t match at all to the rest of your bedroom, will often look pretty awesome. Mix-matched pieces also show a uniqueness and individuality to them. You don’t get that with all-matching pieces. Your bedroom is the one space in your house that you should definitely let your creative side flow free in.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 1

2 – Big, Bold + Beautiful Bed

If you have a big, bold and beautiful bed, the rest of the room won’t need quite so much attention paid to it. The point is to use the bed as the focal feature of the room. This is a great tip for when you don’t have loads of space to play around with. The space you do have will need to be used for other things, so ornaments and soft furnishings often don’t get quite the look-in. When you use your bed as the soft furnishings in question, you’re not taking up any more space than you need to, but still allowing you some decoration / customisation space.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 2

3 – Grey + Silver Bedroom Ideas – Lighting

The lighting in your home will have a great impact on the way your room looks once you’ve painted the walls and added the finishing touches, but the good thing about lighting is that you can play around with it, adding it or taking it away as you need to. Blinds, curtains, voiles and nets can be used to dim the bright sunshine in a room for when you want a darker atmosphere. Candles, lamps, and brighter light bulbs can be used to add lighting into a room.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 3

4 – Wall Coverings + Grey

When it comes to finding the right colour for your walls, rather than picking it first and setting the rest of the room around it, pick it last. Design the room of your dreams with all the features that you love, and then figure out what colour to paint your walls. You may find that an entirely different shade springs to mind, or a completely different colour. Sometimes it pays to think outside the box … or the other way around, like with this wall mural. You could even do the same on one wall with patterned wallpaper.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 4

5 – Textures, Textures, Textures

You might think that grey and silver bedroom ideas would mean boring, but these neutral shades don’t need to be boring or dull. It’s all about adding layers and / or textures, and that’s what a few minor upgrades could add to the mix. A mirror here, a string of lights there, an ottoman throw at the bottom of the bed for an extra seat and a little more storage …

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 5

6 – Pink + Grey

We loved this look, a little bit of pink thrown in with those grey and silver bedroom ideas. Just the right pink accents have been thrown in, showing you how easy it could be to add another statement colour into the mix. Add an art print to the wall, and then some pink pillowcases, and maybe even a couple of pink features to the bedside cabinet … That’s how easy it could be to liven things up. Are you ready for the challenge?

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 6

7 – New Lease of Life

Rather than throwing away old pieces of furniture, why not look at how they can be used in a slightly different way. An old wooden stool, for example, could easily become a cabinet for the side of the bed, and a cute kitchen tray on the top will stop anything from falling off in the middle of the night. You could even consider making something like this from scratch with old pieces of wood. How handy do you feel today?

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 7

8 – Feature Wall

Rather than looking at a headboard for the feature behind your bed, why not make the entire wall a feature instead? You don’t need to look at a map of the world, although this look is pretty staggering. You could leave the rest of the walls in your bedroom a neutral shade, just wallpapering or painting the one wall behind your bed in that feature shade. If you’re looking for an easy way to use these grey and silver bedroom ideas, using the wall-behind-the-bed trick is a great idea.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 8

When the rest of the walls are kept neutral, the entire look isn’t quite so in-your-face as an entire room decked out in the same print all over. It’s also easier to revert back to neutral when it comes to moving out, a great tip for when you’re in rented accommodation.


9 – All the Way Up

If you’re longing for higher ceilings but can’t afford (or don’t want) to move, opt for a clever height-trickery hack that’ll make your ceilings appear higher. If you opt for smaller furniture in terms of height, the ceiling will seem further away and thus higher. You might also want to consider a light ombre of dark to light grey on one focal wall in your bedroom too. This will give the illusion of height. One final trick you might want to throw in is using lighting to illuminate the top of the walls and ceiling.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 9

10 – Space Saver

Work with the space you have rather than trying to make everything you want to buy work in a room that isn’t big enough to home it all. If you have high ceilings, don’t be afraid to build up to give yourself more space. By having everything slightly raised from the floor here, it doesn’t seem quite so cramped and crowded. If everything had been at floor level the room would have seemed much smaller and darker. There are also plenty of storage solutions in a design such as this, and with kids that’s very important.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 10

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10 Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas

Posted by Bed Universe on

There are no rules to how you should decorate your home, except to go with styles and designs that you love. You’re the one who needs to live in it, of course, and that’s definitely the case for rooms such as your bedroom. It’s the room you often take solace in, sleeping, hiding, and generally chilling out in there. You spend more time in your bedroom than you’d think, so it makes sense to make it a place that you love the look of. If grey and silver bedroom ideas are right up your street, you’re going to love the 21 bedroom designs we’re about to show you.

We can’t wait to hear which ones are your favourite, so make sure you let us know in the comments at the bottom. If you’ve got a grey and silver bedroom to die for, send in your pictures! We’d love to feature you.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas

1 – Grey + Silver Theme

Don’t necessarily follow a “theme” when looking at your grey and silver bedroom ideas, instead choose to go with the flow. You might find that pieces that don’t match at all to the rest of your bedroom, will often look pretty awesome. Mix-matched pieces also show a uniqueness and individuality to them. You don’t get that with all-matching pieces. Your bedroom is the one space in your house that you should definitely let your creative side flow free in.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 1

2 – Big, Bold + Beautiful Bed

If you have a big, bold and beautiful bed, the rest of the room won’t need quite so much attention paid to it. The point is to use the bed as the focal feature of the room. This is a great tip for when you don’t have loads of space to play around with. The space you do have will need to be used for other things, so ornaments and soft furnishings often don’t get quite the look-in. When you use your bed as the soft furnishings in question, you’re not taking up any more space than you need to, but still allowing you some decoration / customisation space.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 2

3 – Grey + Silver Bedroom Ideas – Lighting

The lighting in your home will have a great impact on the way your room looks once you’ve painted the walls and added the finishing touches, but the good thing about lighting is that you can play around with it, adding it or taking it away as you need to. Blinds, curtains, voiles and nets can be used to dim the bright sunshine in a room for when you want a darker atmosphere. Candles, lamps, and brighter light bulbs can be used to add lighting into a room.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 3

4 – Wall Coverings + Grey

When it comes to finding the right colour for your walls, rather than picking it first and setting the rest of the room around it, pick it last. Design the room of your dreams with all the features that you love, and then figure out what colour to paint your walls. You may find that an entirely different shade springs to mind, or a completely different colour. Sometimes it pays to think outside the box … or the other way around, like with this wall mural. You could even do the same on one wall with patterned wallpaper.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 4

5 – Textures, Textures, Textures

You might think that grey and silver bedroom ideas would mean boring, but these neutral shades don’t need to be boring or dull. It’s all about adding layers and / or textures, and that’s what a few minor upgrades could add to the mix. A mirror here, a string of lights there, an ottoman throw at the bottom of the bed for an extra seat and a little more storage …

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 5

6 – Pink + Grey

We loved this look, a little bit of pink thrown in with those grey and silver bedroom ideas. Just the right pink accents have been thrown in, showing you how easy it could be to add another statement colour into the mix. Add an art print to the wall, and then some pink pillowcases, and maybe even a couple of pink features to the bedside cabinet … That’s how easy it could be to liven things up. Are you ready for the challenge?

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 6

7 – New Lease of Life

Rather than throwing away old pieces of furniture, why not look at how they can be used in a slightly different way. An old wooden stool, for example, could easily become a cabinet for the side of the bed, and a cute kitchen tray on the top will stop anything from falling off in the middle of the night. You could even consider making something like this from scratch with old pieces of wood. How handy do you feel today?

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 7

8 – Feature Wall

Rather than looking at a headboard for the feature behind your bed, why not make the entire wall a feature instead? You don’t need to look at a map of the world, although this look is pretty staggering. You could leave the rest of the walls in your bedroom a neutral shade, just wallpapering or painting the one wall behind your bed in that feature shade. If you’re looking for an easy way to use these grey and silver bedroom ideas, using the wall-behind-the-bed trick is a great idea.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 8

When the rest of the walls are kept neutral, the entire look isn’t quite so in-your-face as an entire room decked out in the same print all over. It’s also easier to revert back to neutral when it comes to moving out, a great tip for when you’re in rented accommodation.


9 – All the Way Up

If you’re longing for higher ceilings but can’t afford (or don’t want) to move, opt for a clever height-trickery hack that’ll make your ceilings appear higher. If you opt for smaller furniture in terms of height, the ceiling will seem further away and thus higher. You might also want to consider a light ombre of dark to light grey on one focal wall in your bedroom too. This will give the illusion of height. One final trick you might want to throw in is using lighting to illuminate the top of the walls and ceiling.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 9

10 – Space Saver

Work with the space you have rather than trying to make everything you want to buy work in a room that isn’t big enough to home it all. If you have high ceilings, don’t be afraid to build up to give yourself more space. By having everything slightly raised from the floor here, it doesn’t seem quite so cramped and crowded. If everything had been at floor level the room would have seemed much smaller and darker. There are also plenty of storage solutions in a design such as this, and with kids that’s very important.

Grey and Silver Bedroom Ideas 10

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Better Sleep , Better Life

Posted by Bed Universe on

Welcome to this guide about achieving better sleep for a better life. The information and resources throughout the site will be beneficial to you, if any of the following scenarios strike a familiar chord.

Get Better Sleep
  • You're reading this through a murky haze of tiredness, trawling the internet at 4 a.m. because you can't sleep again!
  • Most mornings find you as exhausted as you were when your head hit the pillow the night before.
  • You regularly feel moody, irritable, clumsy, or just downright depressed because you can't get a decent night's sleep.
  • You snore, sleep walk, suffer from restless legs syndrome, have nightmares - or simply don't sleep well for whatever reason.

It may help to know that you're not alone in your quest for better sleep. Research studies a demonstrate that approximately 25% of people suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Yet, sleep deprivation can impose detrimental effects on individuals and the people around them.

Lack of quality, sufficient sleep on a regular basis can negatively impact your physical health, emotional well-being, and safety.

Inadequate sleep can put you at greater risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes and other serious illnesses.

Therefore, the importance of getting a good night's sleep should never be taken for granted.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke reports that the amount of sleep each person needs varies with age. Babies typically need about 16 hours a day and teens should get around 9 hours of sleep each night. Most adults require 7 to 8 hours a night, although some people may need as few as 5 hours or as many as 10 hours of sleep each day.

When you get quality sleep on a regular basis, you'll...

better sleep better life
  • Wake up easily when the alarm goes off, without feeling as though you need another 12 hours shut-eye
  • Have quicker reflexes, clearer thought processes and a spring in your step and energy and enthusiasm to spare
  • Feel cheerful and upbeat instead of grumpy, irritable or depressed
  • Reduce your risk for serious illnesses and accidents

All of the above are attainable goals when you're able to sleep better every night. So, please take the time to peruse this site to learn more about good sleep habits and addressing sleep disorders for enhanced health and vitality.

Yes, better sleep really DOES lead to a better life!

Read more

Better Sleep , Better Life

Posted by Bed Universe on

Welcome to this guide about achieving better sleep for a better life. The information and resources throughout the site will be beneficial to you, if any of the following scenarios strike a familiar chord.

Get Better Sleep
  • You're reading this through a murky haze of tiredness, trawling the internet at 4 a.m. because you can't sleep again!
  • Most mornings find you as exhausted as you were when your head hit the pillow the night before.
  • You regularly feel moody, irritable, clumsy, or just downright depressed because you can't get a decent night's sleep.
  • You snore, sleep walk, suffer from restless legs syndrome, have nightmares - or simply don't sleep well for whatever reason.

It may help to know that you're not alone in your quest for better sleep. Research studies a demonstrate that approximately 25% of people suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Yet, sleep deprivation can impose detrimental effects on individuals and the people around them.

Lack of quality, sufficient sleep on a regular basis can negatively impact your physical health, emotional well-being, and safety.

Inadequate sleep can put you at greater risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes and other serious illnesses.

Therefore, the importance of getting a good night's sleep should never be taken for granted.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke reports that the amount of sleep each person needs varies with age. Babies typically need about 16 hours a day and teens should get around 9 hours of sleep each night. Most adults require 7 to 8 hours a night, although some people may need as few as 5 hours or as many as 10 hours of sleep each day.

When you get quality sleep on a regular basis, you'll...

better sleep better life
  • Wake up easily when the alarm goes off, without feeling as though you need another 12 hours shut-eye
  • Have quicker reflexes, clearer thought processes and a spring in your step and energy and enthusiasm to spare
  • Feel cheerful and upbeat instead of grumpy, irritable or depressed
  • Reduce your risk for serious illnesses and accidents

All of the above are attainable goals when you're able to sleep better every night. So, please take the time to peruse this site to learn more about good sleep habits and addressing sleep disorders for enhanced health and vitality.

Yes, better sleep really DOES lead to a better life!

Read more


The Best Sleeping Tips

Posted by Bed Universe on

How to Sleep Better

Simple Steps to Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

Dog sleeping in a bed

Sleeping well directly affects your mental and physical health and the quality of your waking life. Fall short and it can take a serious toll on your daytime energy, productivity, emotional balance, and even your weight. Yet many of us regularly toss and turn at night, struggling to get the sleep we need. There is a solution. Making simple but important changes to your daytime routine and bedtime habits can have a profound impact on how well you sleep, leaving you feeling mentally sharp, emotionally balanced, and full of energy all day long.

 

 

How can I get a better night’s sleep?

Getting a good night’s sleep may seem like an impossible goal when you’re wide awake at 3 a.m., but you have much more control over the quality of your sleep than you probably realize. Just as the way you feel during your waking hours often hinges on how well you sleep at night, so the cure for sleep difficulties can often be found in your daily routine.

Unhealthy daytime habits and lifestyle choices can leave you tossing and turning at night and adversely affect your mood, brain and heart health, immune system, creativity, vitality, and weight. But by experimenting with the following tips, you can enjoy better sleep at night, improve your mental and physical health, and improve how you think and feel during the day.

Tip 1: Keep in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle

Getting in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle, or circadian rhythm, is one of the most important strategies for sleeping better. If you keep a regular sleep-wake schedule, you’ll feel much more refreshed and energized than if you sleep the same number of hours at different times, even if you only alter your sleep schedule by an hour or two.

Try to go to sleep and get up at the same time every day. This helps set your body’s internal clock and optimize the quality of your sleep. Choose a bed time when you normally feel tired, so that you don’t toss and turn. If you’re getting enough sleep, you should wake up naturally without an alarm. If you need an alarm clock, you may need an earlier bedtime.

Avoid sleeping in—even on weekends. The more your weekend/weekday sleep schedules differ, the worse the jetlag-like symptoms you’ll experience. If you need to make up for a late night, opt for a daytime nap rather than sleeping in. This allows you to pay off your sleep debt without disturbing your natural sleep-wake rhythm.

Be smart about napping. While napping is a good way to make up for lost sleep, if you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at night, napping can make things worse. Limit naps to 15 to 20 minutes in the early afternoon.

Fight after-dinner drowsiness. If you get sleepy way before your bedtime, get off the couch and do something mildly stimulating, such as washing the dishes, calling a friend, or getting clothes ready for the next day. If you give in to the drowsiness, you may wake up later in the night and have trouble getting back to sleep.

Tip 2: Control your exposure to light

Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure that helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle. Your brain secretes more melatonin when it’s dark—making you sleepy—and less when it’s light—making you more alert. However, many aspects of modern life can alter your body’s production of melatonin and shift your circadian rhythm.

How to influence your exposure to light

During the day:

Expose yourself to bright sunlight in the morning. The closer to the time you get up, the better. Have your coffee outside, for example, or eat breakfast by a sunny window. The light on your face will help you wake up

Spend more time outside during daylight. Take your work breaks outside in sunlight, exercise outside, or walk your dog during the day instead of at night.

Let as much natural light into your home or workspace as possible. Keep curtains and blinds open during the day, and try to move your desk closer to the window.

If necessary, use a light therapy box. This simulates sunshine and can be especially useful during short winter days.

At night:

Avoid bright screens within 1-2 hours of your bedtime. The blue light emitted by your phone, tablet, computer, or TV is especially disruptive. You can minimize the impact by using devices with smaller screens, turning the brightness down, or using light-altering software such as f.lux.

Say no to late-night television. Not only does the light from a TV suppress melatonin, but many programs are stimulating rather than relaxing. Try listening to music or audio books instead.

Don’t read with backlit devices. Tablets that are backlit are more disruptive than e-readers that don’t have their own light source.

When it’s time to sleep, make sure the room is dark. Use heavy curtains or shades to block light from windows, or try a sleep mask. Also consider covering up electronics that emit light.

Keep the lights down if you get up during the night. If you need some light to move around safely, try installing a dim nightlight in the hall or bathroom or using a small flashlight. This will make it easier for you to fall back to sleep.

Tip 3: Exercise during the day

People who exercise regularly sleep better at night and feel less sleepy during the day. Regular exercise also improves the symptoms of insomnia and sleep apnea and increases the amount of time you spend in the deep, restorative stages of sleep.

  • The more vigorously you exercise, the more powerful the sleep benefits. But even light exercise—such as walking for just 10 minutes a day—improves sleep quality.
  • It can take several months of regular activity before you experience the full sleep-promoting effects. So be patient and focus on building an exercise habit that sticks.

For better sleep, time your exercise right

Exercise speeds up your metabolism, elevates body temperature, and stimulates hormones such as cortisol. This isn’t a problem if you’re exercising in the morning or afternoon, but too close to bed and it can interfere with sleep.

Try to finish moderate to vigorous workouts at least three hours before bedtime. If you’re still experiencing sleep difficulties, move your workouts even earlier. Relaxing, low-impact exercises such as yoga or gentle stretching in the evening can help promote sleep.

Tip 4: Be smart about what you eat and drink

Your daytime eating habits play a role in how well you sleep, especially in the hours before bedtime.

Limit caffeine and nicotine. You might be surprised to know that caffeine can cause sleep problems up to ten to twelve hours after drinking it! Similarly, smoking is another stimulant that can disrupt your sleep, especially if you smoke close to bedtime.

Avoid big meals at night. Try to make dinnertime earlier in the evening, and avoid heavy, rich foods within two hours of bed. Spicy or acidic foods can cause stomach trouble and heartburn.

Avoid alcohol before bed. While a nightcap may help you relax, it interferes with your sleep cycle once you’re out.

Avoid drinking too many liquids in the evening. Drinking lots of fluids may result in frequent bathroom trips throughout the night.

Cut back on sugary foods and refined carbs. Eating lots of sugar and refined carbs such as white bread, white rice, and pasta during the day can trigger wakefulness at night and pull you out of the deep, restorative stages of sleep.

Nighttime snacks help you sleep

For some people, a light snack before bed can help promote sleep. For others, eating before bed leads to indigestion and make sleeping more difficult. If you need a bedtime snack, try:

  • Half of a turkey sandwich
  • A small bowl of whole-grain, low-sugar cereal
  • Milk or yogurt
  • A banana

Tip 5: Wind down and clear your head

Do you find yourself unable to sleep or waking up night after night? Residual stress, worry, and anger from your day can make it very difficult to sleep well.

  • If anxiety or chronic worrying dominates your thoughts at night, there are steps you can take to
    learn how to stop worrying and look at life from a more positive perspective. Even counting sheep is more productive than worrying at bedtime.
  • If the stress of work, family, or school is keeping you awake, you may need help with stress management. By learning how to manage your time effectively, handle stress in a productive way, and maintain a calm, positive outlook, you’ll be able to sleep better at night.
  • The more overstimulated your brain becomes during the day, the harder it can be slow down and unwind at night. During the day, many of us overstress our brains by constantly interrupting tasks to check our phones, emails, or social media. Try to set aside specific times for these things, and focus on one task at a time. When it comes to getting to sleep at night, your brain won’t be accustomed to seeking fresh stimulation and you’ll be better able to unwind.

Relaxation techniques for better sleep

Practicing relaxation techniques before bed is a great way to wind down, calm the mind, and prepare for sleep. Try:

Deep breathing. Close your eyes and take deep, slow breaths, making each breath even deeper than the last.

Progressive muscle relaxation. Starting with your toes, tense all the muscles as tightly as you can, then completely relax. Work your way up to the top of your head.

Visualizing a peaceful, restful place. Close your eyes and imagine a place that’s calming and peaceful. Concentrate on how relaxed this place makes you feel.

Bedtime rituals to help you relax

Create a “toolbox” of relaxing bedtime rituals to help you unwind before sleep. For example:

  • Read a book or magazine by a soft light
  • Take a warm bath
  • Listen to soft music
  • Do some easy stretches
  • Wind down with a favorite hobby
  • Listen to books on tape
  • Make simple preparations for the next day
  • Dim the lights in the hours leading up to bed

Tip 6: Improve your sleep environment

A peaceful bedtime routine sends a powerful signal to your brain that it’s time to wind down and let go of the day’s stresses. Sometimes even small changes to your environment can make a big difference to your quality of sleep.

Keep your room dark, cool, and quiet

Keep noise down. If you can’t avoid or eliminate noise from neighbors, traffic, or other people in your household, try masking it with a fan or sound machine. Earplugs may also help.

Keep your room cool. Most people sleep best in a slightly cool room (around 65° F or 18° C) with adequate ventilation. A bedroom that is too hot or too cold can interfere with quality sleep.

Make sure your bed is comfortable. Your bed covers should leave you enough room to stretch and turn comfortably without becoming tangled. If you often wake up with a sore back or an aching neck, you may need to experiment with different levels of mattress firmness, foam toppers, and pillows that provide more or less support.

Reserve your bed for sleeping and sex. By not working, watching TV, or using your computer in bed, your brain will associate the bedroom with just sleep and sex, which makes it easier to wind down at night.

Tip 7: Learn ways to get back to sleep

It’s normal to wake briefly during the night but if you’re having trouble falling back asleep, these tips may help:

Stay out of your head. Hard as it may be, try not to stress over your inability to fall asleep again, because that stress only encourages your body to stay awake. To stay out of your head, focus on the feelings in your body or practice breathing exercises. Take a breath in, then breathe out slowly while saying or thinking the word, “Ahhh.” Take another breath and repeat.

Make relaxation your goal, not sleep. If you find it hard to fall back asleep, try a relaxation technique such as visualization, progressive muscle relaxation, or meditation, which can be done without even getting out of bed. Even though it’s not a replacement for sleep, relaxation can still help rejuvenate your body.

Do a quiet, non-stimulating activity. If you’ve been awake for more than 15 minutes, get out of bed and do a quiet, non-stimulating activity, such as reading a book. Keep the lights dim and avoid screens so as not to cue your body that it’s time to wake up.

Postpone worrying and brainstorming. If you wake during the night feeling anxious about something, make a brief note of it on paper and postpone worrying about it until the next day when it will be easier to resolve. Similarly, if a great idea is keeping you awake, make a note of it on paper and fall back to sleep knowing you’ll be much more productive after a good night’s rest.

Read more

The Best Sleeping Tips

Posted by Bed Universe on

How to Sleep Better

Simple Steps to Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

Dog sleeping in a bed

Sleeping well directly affects your mental and physical health and the quality of your waking life. Fall short and it can take a serious toll on your daytime energy, productivity, emotional balance, and even your weight. Yet many of us regularly toss and turn at night, struggling to get the sleep we need. There is a solution. Making simple but important changes to your daytime routine and bedtime habits can have a profound impact on how well you sleep, leaving you feeling mentally sharp, emotionally balanced, and full of energy all day long.

 

 

How can I get a better night’s sleep?

Getting a good night’s sleep may seem like an impossible goal when you’re wide awake at 3 a.m., but you have much more control over the quality of your sleep than you probably realize. Just as the way you feel during your waking hours often hinges on how well you sleep at night, so the cure for sleep difficulties can often be found in your daily routine.

Unhealthy daytime habits and lifestyle choices can leave you tossing and turning at night and adversely affect your mood, brain and heart health, immune system, creativity, vitality, and weight. But by experimenting with the following tips, you can enjoy better sleep at night, improve your mental and physical health, and improve how you think and feel during the day.

Tip 1: Keep in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle

Getting in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle, or circadian rhythm, is one of the most important strategies for sleeping better. If you keep a regular sleep-wake schedule, you’ll feel much more refreshed and energized than if you sleep the same number of hours at different times, even if you only alter your sleep schedule by an hour or two.

Try to go to sleep and get up at the same time every day. This helps set your body’s internal clock and optimize the quality of your sleep. Choose a bed time when you normally feel tired, so that you don’t toss and turn. If you’re getting enough sleep, you should wake up naturally without an alarm. If you need an alarm clock, you may need an earlier bedtime.

Avoid sleeping in—even on weekends. The more your weekend/weekday sleep schedules differ, the worse the jetlag-like symptoms you’ll experience. If you need to make up for a late night, opt for a daytime nap rather than sleeping in. This allows you to pay off your sleep debt without disturbing your natural sleep-wake rhythm.

Be smart about napping. While napping is a good way to make up for lost sleep, if you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at night, napping can make things worse. Limit naps to 15 to 20 minutes in the early afternoon.

Fight after-dinner drowsiness. If you get sleepy way before your bedtime, get off the couch and do something mildly stimulating, such as washing the dishes, calling a friend, or getting clothes ready for the next day. If you give in to the drowsiness, you may wake up later in the night and have trouble getting back to sleep.

Tip 2: Control your exposure to light

Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure that helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle. Your brain secretes more melatonin when it’s dark—making you sleepy—and less when it’s light—making you more alert. However, many aspects of modern life can alter your body’s production of melatonin and shift your circadian rhythm.

How to influence your exposure to light

During the day:

Expose yourself to bright sunlight in the morning. The closer to the time you get up, the better. Have your coffee outside, for example, or eat breakfast by a sunny window. The light on your face will help you wake up

Spend more time outside during daylight. Take your work breaks outside in sunlight, exercise outside, or walk your dog during the day instead of at night.

Let as much natural light into your home or workspace as possible. Keep curtains and blinds open during the day, and try to move your desk closer to the window.

If necessary, use a light therapy box. This simulates sunshine and can be especially useful during short winter days.

At night:

Avoid bright screens within 1-2 hours of your bedtime. The blue light emitted by your phone, tablet, computer, or TV is especially disruptive. You can minimize the impact by using devices with smaller screens, turning the brightness down, or using light-altering software such as f.lux.

Say no to late-night television. Not only does the light from a TV suppress melatonin, but many programs are stimulating rather than relaxing. Try listening to music or audio books instead.

Don’t read with backlit devices. Tablets that are backlit are more disruptive than e-readers that don’t have their own light source.

When it’s time to sleep, make sure the room is dark. Use heavy curtains or shades to block light from windows, or try a sleep mask. Also consider covering up electronics that emit light.

Keep the lights down if you get up during the night. If you need some light to move around safely, try installing a dim nightlight in the hall or bathroom or using a small flashlight. This will make it easier for you to fall back to sleep.

Tip 3: Exercise during the day

People who exercise regularly sleep better at night and feel less sleepy during the day. Regular exercise also improves the symptoms of insomnia and sleep apnea and increases the amount of time you spend in the deep, restorative stages of sleep.

  • The more vigorously you exercise, the more powerful the sleep benefits. But even light exercise—such as walking for just 10 minutes a day—improves sleep quality.
  • It can take several months of regular activity before you experience the full sleep-promoting effects. So be patient and focus on building an exercise habit that sticks.

For better sleep, time your exercise right

Exercise speeds up your metabolism, elevates body temperature, and stimulates hormones such as cortisol. This isn’t a problem if you’re exercising in the morning or afternoon, but too close to bed and it can interfere with sleep.

Try to finish moderate to vigorous workouts at least three hours before bedtime. If you’re still experiencing sleep difficulties, move your workouts even earlier. Relaxing, low-impact exercises such as yoga or gentle stretching in the evening can help promote sleep.

Tip 4: Be smart about what you eat and drink

Your daytime eating habits play a role in how well you sleep, especially in the hours before bedtime.

Limit caffeine and nicotine. You might be surprised to know that caffeine can cause sleep problems up to ten to twelve hours after drinking it! Similarly, smoking is another stimulant that can disrupt your sleep, especially if you smoke close to bedtime.

Avoid big meals at night. Try to make dinnertime earlier in the evening, and avoid heavy, rich foods within two hours of bed. Spicy or acidic foods can cause stomach trouble and heartburn.

Avoid alcohol before bed. While a nightcap may help you relax, it interferes with your sleep cycle once you’re out.

Avoid drinking too many liquids in the evening. Drinking lots of fluids may result in frequent bathroom trips throughout the night.

Cut back on sugary foods and refined carbs. Eating lots of sugar and refined carbs such as white bread, white rice, and pasta during the day can trigger wakefulness at night and pull you out of the deep, restorative stages of sleep.

Nighttime snacks help you sleep

For some people, a light snack before bed can help promote sleep. For others, eating before bed leads to indigestion and make sleeping more difficult. If you need a bedtime snack, try:

  • Half of a turkey sandwich
  • A small bowl of whole-grain, low-sugar cereal
  • Milk or yogurt
  • A banana

Tip 5: Wind down and clear your head

Do you find yourself unable to sleep or waking up night after night? Residual stress, worry, and anger from your day can make it very difficult to sleep well.

  • If anxiety or chronic worrying dominates your thoughts at night, there are steps you can take to
    learn how to stop worrying and look at life from a more positive perspective. Even counting sheep is more productive than worrying at bedtime.
  • If the stress of work, family, or school is keeping you awake, you may need help with stress management. By learning how to manage your time effectively, handle stress in a productive way, and maintain a calm, positive outlook, you’ll be able to sleep better at night.
  • The more overstimulated your brain becomes during the day, the harder it can be slow down and unwind at night. During the day, many of us overstress our brains by constantly interrupting tasks to check our phones, emails, or social media. Try to set aside specific times for these things, and focus on one task at a time. When it comes to getting to sleep at night, your brain won’t be accustomed to seeking fresh stimulation and you’ll be better able to unwind.

Relaxation techniques for better sleep

Practicing relaxation techniques before bed is a great way to wind down, calm the mind, and prepare for sleep. Try:

Deep breathing. Close your eyes and take deep, slow breaths, making each breath even deeper than the last.

Progressive muscle relaxation. Starting with your toes, tense all the muscles as tightly as you can, then completely relax. Work your way up to the top of your head.

Visualizing a peaceful, restful place. Close your eyes and imagine a place that’s calming and peaceful. Concentrate on how relaxed this place makes you feel.

Bedtime rituals to help you relax

Create a “toolbox” of relaxing bedtime rituals to help you unwind before sleep. For example:

  • Read a book or magazine by a soft light
  • Take a warm bath
  • Listen to soft music
  • Do some easy stretches
  • Wind down with a favorite hobby
  • Listen to books on tape
  • Make simple preparations for the next day
  • Dim the lights in the hours leading up to bed

Tip 6: Improve your sleep environment

A peaceful bedtime routine sends a powerful signal to your brain that it’s time to wind down and let go of the day’s stresses. Sometimes even small changes to your environment can make a big difference to your quality of sleep.

Keep your room dark, cool, and quiet

Keep noise down. If you can’t avoid or eliminate noise from neighbors, traffic, or other people in your household, try masking it with a fan or sound machine. Earplugs may also help.

Keep your room cool. Most people sleep best in a slightly cool room (around 65° F or 18° C) with adequate ventilation. A bedroom that is too hot or too cold can interfere with quality sleep.

Make sure your bed is comfortable. Your bed covers should leave you enough room to stretch and turn comfortably without becoming tangled. If you often wake up with a sore back or an aching neck, you may need to experiment with different levels of mattress firmness, foam toppers, and pillows that provide more or less support.

Reserve your bed for sleeping and sex. By not working, watching TV, or using your computer in bed, your brain will associate the bedroom with just sleep and sex, which makes it easier to wind down at night.

Tip 7: Learn ways to get back to sleep

It’s normal to wake briefly during the night but if you’re having trouble falling back asleep, these tips may help:

Stay out of your head. Hard as it may be, try not to stress over your inability to fall asleep again, because that stress only encourages your body to stay awake. To stay out of your head, focus on the feelings in your body or practice breathing exercises. Take a breath in, then breathe out slowly while saying or thinking the word, “Ahhh.” Take another breath and repeat.

Make relaxation your goal, not sleep. If you find it hard to fall back asleep, try a relaxation technique such as visualization, progressive muscle relaxation, or meditation, which can be done without even getting out of bed. Even though it’s not a replacement for sleep, relaxation can still help rejuvenate your body.

Do a quiet, non-stimulating activity. If you’ve been awake for more than 15 minutes, get out of bed and do a quiet, non-stimulating activity, such as reading a book. Keep the lights dim and avoid screens so as not to cue your body that it’s time to wake up.

Postpone worrying and brainstorming. If you wake during the night feeling anxious about something, make a brief note of it on paper and postpone worrying about it until the next day when it will be easier to resolve. Similarly, if a great idea is keeping you awake, make a note of it on paper and fall back to sleep knowing you’ll be much more productive after a good night’s rest.

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HOW MANY OF US SLEEP WITH OUR PETS?

Posted by Bed Universe on

DOZING WITH YOUR DACHSHUND: HOW MANY OF US SLEEP WITH OUR PETS?

Pets are an indispensable part of many families. Like most people, you’ll most likely display your affection by playing with your pet cat or dog, speaking to it as if it were human, and maybe even aligning meal times with the rest of the family.

But some of us take this notion further than others. For those who simply can’t get enough of their pets, they’ll even allow them to sleep in the same bed. We asked 1,000 UK pet owners about how involved their pets are in their sleeping habits, and looked at the evidence that might suggest it’s a good idea.

Women prefer sleeping with pets

At 36%, over a third of pet owners we surveyed said they regularly allow their cat or dog to sleep in their bed with them at night. One in five of us claims to be completely against it.

Women appear to be more accepting of the idea, with 42% of them saying they allow their pets to hop on the bed on a nightly basis. This compared to just 30% of men.

It’s a trend that we may be increasingly adopting too. The younger our respondents were, the more likely it is they would sleep with their pets. The youngest generation (18-24 year olds) were the most likely to regularly sleep with their pet (43%), whilst the oldest generation holds the strongest feelings against it (33% said they were completely against it).

Spread the respondents across the UK, and habitants of south coast city Southampton were the most likely to regularly sleep with a pet (46%), followed by Leeds (44%) and Belfast (41%).

Cats and dogs based in Manchester are the ones left looking elsewhere for somewhere to sleep. 29% of Mancunians said they were against pets in their bed, with Cardiff second (28%) and Bristol third (26%).

There is evidence out there that suggests it’s not a bad idea too. On cold nights in particular, a dog’s warmth can keep us toasty in bed. Aside from their fur coats, a dog’s body temperature is three to six degrees higher than a human’s.

Instinctively, you might think your quality of sleep, or your pet’s behaviour may be affected by sleeping on the bed every night. Recent studies have shown it doesn’t necessarily negatively affect your quality of sleep, and sleep health expert Martin Reed said if it works for you, then carry on:

“If you are happy sleeping with your pet, there is no reason to stop. However, if you find sleep difficult, you may want to try sleeping without your pet for a week or two to see if that has any effect on your sleep. You can always start by not allowing them on the bed, and then progress to not allowing them in the bedroom.”

We also spoke to certified dog trainer Kristi Benson, who said dogs won’t develop any behavioural issues as a result of sleeping on the bed:

“You may have been told that allowing a dog on the bed will make the dog dominant, or cause jealousy issues between the dog and the people.”

“Luckily for these people and their dogs, modern dog training has consigned all those ideas to the waste bin. Dogs sleeping on the bed are not gaining any status in the relationship or likely to develop worrisome behaviour problems from it”

Pets make for better mental health

We also asked pet owners if they thought that their cat or dog had a positive impact on their stress levels, to which 77% agreed.

Again, the science is out there when looking for an explanation. A 2015 study in Japan found that a hormone associated with human bonding and love also applies to interactions with your pet dog. Levels of Oxycontin were found to increase in both humans and dogs when engaging in 30 minutes of eye contact.

The affection we get from pets can have a powerful affect on our mental health, as Dr. Kelly Kandra Hughes confirmed:

“In order to meet our highest potential, humans' more basic needs of safety and belonging/love need to be met.

“Having a pet is like a two-for-one with our lower needs -- they provide us with unconditional love and companionship and help us feel more secure in our living situations.”

Pet ownership is also good for our physical health – particularly if you have a dog. Due to the increase in exercise you inevitably get from walking a dog, canine ownership has been linked to a reduction in your risk of cardiovascular disease.

But pets still know how to embarrass us

Despite the raft of benefits pets bring to our lives, they can still be more than a little troublesome around the home. We asked respondents to tell us the most embarrassing or naughtiest thing their pet has done, and pet owners across the country will recognise the list of misdemeanours well.

The top two are classics when it comes to pet misbehaviour. 31% of pet owners have found their beloved pet pooch eating without permission or weeing indoors.

Other common areas for disobedience occur when guests come to town. Whilst 15% of pets have eaten a guests food, and 10% have chewed on their shoes, 16% have committed quite possibly the most embarrassing of acts on their guests – by humping their leg.

 

Read more

HOW MANY OF US SLEEP WITH OUR PETS?

Posted by Bed Universe on

DOZING WITH YOUR DACHSHUND: HOW MANY OF US SLEEP WITH OUR PETS?

Pets are an indispensable part of many families. Like most people, you’ll most likely display your affection by playing with your pet cat or dog, speaking to it as if it were human, and maybe even aligning meal times with the rest of the family.

But some of us take this notion further than others. For those who simply can’t get enough of their pets, they’ll even allow them to sleep in the same bed. We asked 1,000 UK pet owners about how involved their pets are in their sleeping habits, and looked at the evidence that might suggest it’s a good idea.

Women prefer sleeping with pets

At 36%, over a third of pet owners we surveyed said they regularly allow their cat or dog to sleep in their bed with them at night. One in five of us claims to be completely against it.

Women appear to be more accepting of the idea, with 42% of them saying they allow their pets to hop on the bed on a nightly basis. This compared to just 30% of men.

It’s a trend that we may be increasingly adopting too. The younger our respondents were, the more likely it is they would sleep with their pets. The youngest generation (18-24 year olds) were the most likely to regularly sleep with their pet (43%), whilst the oldest generation holds the strongest feelings against it (33% said they were completely against it).

Spread the respondents across the UK, and habitants of south coast city Southampton were the most likely to regularly sleep with a pet (46%), followed by Leeds (44%) and Belfast (41%).

Cats and dogs based in Manchester are the ones left looking elsewhere for somewhere to sleep. 29% of Mancunians said they were against pets in their bed, with Cardiff second (28%) and Bristol third (26%).

There is evidence out there that suggests it’s not a bad idea too. On cold nights in particular, a dog’s warmth can keep us toasty in bed. Aside from their fur coats, a dog’s body temperature is three to six degrees higher than a human’s.

Instinctively, you might think your quality of sleep, or your pet’s behaviour may be affected by sleeping on the bed every night. Recent studies have shown it doesn’t necessarily negatively affect your quality of sleep, and sleep health expert Martin Reed said if it works for you, then carry on:

“If you are happy sleeping with your pet, there is no reason to stop. However, if you find sleep difficult, you may want to try sleeping without your pet for a week or two to see if that has any effect on your sleep. You can always start by not allowing them on the bed, and then progress to not allowing them in the bedroom.”

We also spoke to certified dog trainer Kristi Benson, who said dogs won’t develop any behavioural issues as a result of sleeping on the bed:

“You may have been told that allowing a dog on the bed will make the dog dominant, or cause jealousy issues between the dog and the people.”

“Luckily for these people and their dogs, modern dog training has consigned all those ideas to the waste bin. Dogs sleeping on the bed are not gaining any status in the relationship or likely to develop worrisome behaviour problems from it”

Pets make for better mental health

We also asked pet owners if they thought that their cat or dog had a positive impact on their stress levels, to which 77% agreed.

Again, the science is out there when looking for an explanation. A 2015 study in Japan found that a hormone associated with human bonding and love also applies to interactions with your pet dog. Levels of Oxycontin were found to increase in both humans and dogs when engaging in 30 minutes of eye contact.

The affection we get from pets can have a powerful affect on our mental health, as Dr. Kelly Kandra Hughes confirmed:

“In order to meet our highest potential, humans' more basic needs of safety and belonging/love need to be met.

“Having a pet is like a two-for-one with our lower needs -- they provide us with unconditional love and companionship and help us feel more secure in our living situations.”

Pet ownership is also good for our physical health – particularly if you have a dog. Due to the increase in exercise you inevitably get from walking a dog, canine ownership has been linked to a reduction in your risk of cardiovascular disease.

But pets still know how to embarrass us

Despite the raft of benefits pets bring to our lives, they can still be more than a little troublesome around the home. We asked respondents to tell us the most embarrassing or naughtiest thing their pet has done, and pet owners across the country will recognise the list of misdemeanours well.

The top two are classics when it comes to pet misbehaviour. 31% of pet owners have found their beloved pet pooch eating without permission or weeing indoors.

Other common areas for disobedience occur when guests come to town. Whilst 15% of pets have eaten a guests food, and 10% have chewed on their shoes, 16% have committed quite possibly the most embarrassing of acts on their guests – by humping their leg.

 

Read more